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    Entries in retirement (3)

    Friday
    Jan272017

    The Week in Public Finance: What We Don't Know About Sanctuary Cities' Funding, New Reasons to Save and More

    A roundup of money (and other) news governments can use.

    BY  JANUARY 27, 2017

    What We Don't Know About Trump's 'Sanctuary City' Order

    On Wednesday, President Donald Trump took his first move to defund cities that refuse to cooperate with federal efforts to deport undocumented immigrants. Trump signed an executive order directing the Secretary of Homeland Security to look at federal grant funding to cities “to figure out how we can defund those streams,” said White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer.

    Many of the nation’s largest cities -- including Chicago, Los Angeles, New York City and San Francisco -- are immigrant sanctuaries and have said they won’t back down from their policy.

    Click to read more ...

    Monday
    Oct032016

    The Week in Public Finance: Mega-Subsidies Math, a Comeback for Bond Insurance and More

    BY  SEPTEMBER 2, 2016

    Megadeals Don’t Add Up

    When it comes to economic development, spending more often results in a smaller return.

    Looking at more than 170 economic development "megadeals" made in recent decades, a new report finds that states and localities spend more than $658,000 per job on average. By contrast, “most workforce development programs cost only a few thousand dollars per job, and studies find they pay off well,” said Thursday's report by Good Jobs First, which tracks government subsidies.

    Click to read more ...

    Friday
    Jul082016

    The Week in Public Finance: States in Recession, Higher Ed Winners and Losers, and Virtual Retirement

    A roundup of money (and other) news governments can use.
    BY  JULY 8, 2016

    Oklahoma's in a Recession

    New economic data shows what Oklahoma officials have been fearing: The state has officially entered a recession. Revised federal Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) data shows that the state’s gross domestic product was negative for most of 2015.

    A recession starts when there are two quarters of economic contraction. Originally, the BEA reported that Oklahoma’s economy contracted in the second quarter, grew by 0.1 percent during the third quarter and contracted again in the last quarter of last year. But the third quarter figure was recently revised downward to -0.6 percent.

    Data for the first quarter of 2016 is expected to be released later this month, but according to State Treasurer Ken Miller, the prospects don’t look good.

    “General indicators fail to point to any marked economic recovery at this point,” he said in his latest state economic report.

    Click to read more ...