Find me on:
This form does not yet contain any fields.
    Powered by Squarespace
    Subscribe

    Entries in Repeal and replace (2)

    Friday
    Mar242017

    The Week in Public Finance: Detroit's Big Pension Plan, Debating the Pension Crisis and Counties Under the Gun

    BY  MARCH 24, 2017

    Detroit Hops on Pension Bandwagon

    Detroit is joining Oklahoma and Kentucky in establishing a pension reserve fund. The fund essentially acts like a savings account; it's a place for governments to set aside money to help with increasing pension costs. In Detroit’s case, the fund will help the city plan for 2024, when pension costs are expected to skyrocket from $20 million annually to $200 million a year.

    Thanks to Detroit's exit plan from bankruptcy in 2014, the city isn't paying the full cost of its pensions right now. A charitable foundation and the city's water and sewer system are shouldering much of those costs until 2023.

    The Takeaway:  Pension reserve funds are still largely experimental. The idea is that they will help buffer a pension system from reduced government payments during times of fiscal stress. Of course, a lot depends on how these reserve funds are cultivated. To be truly effective, they must grow to total much more than the government’s annual pension payment.

    Click to read more ...

    Friday
    Mar102017

    The Week in Public Finance: Paying for Repeal and Replace, SEC's New Disclosure Rule and the Online Sales Tax Fight

    BY  MARCH 10, 2017

     

    The Cost of 'RepubliCare'

    Congressional Republicans this week revealed their replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act. Fiscally, the plan does what the GOP promised: If passed, it is expected to make health-care spending less expensive for the federal government (pending the assessment from the Congressional Budget Office.) States, on the other hand, will have some tough decisions to make regarding Medicaid.

    Under the proposed plan, Medicaid allotments would be capped based on the program's per-capita enrollment in that state. Currently, Medicaid has an open-ended funding structure based on matching whatever a state spends.

    While the plan doesn't repeal the Medicaid expansion, it starts to ramp down that population beginning in 2020 by discontinuing the federal subsidy for any new expansion enrollee. It also works to pare down the population by disqualifying any participant who lets their enrollment lapse and requiring states to redetermine enrollee eligibility every six months.

    Click to read more ...