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    Entries in NASBO (2)

    Thursday
    Dec292016

    5 Hot Topics Hitting Public Finance in 2017

    BY  DECEMBER 29, 2016

    In what could be a tumultuous year for state and local finances, these five issues are likely to take center stage.

    Tax Reform

    Many Capitol Hill watchers expect federal tax reform to roll forward in some fashion in 2017 now that a Republican will be in the White House. There are two major proposals on the table that could directly result in higher costs for states.

    For starters, many in Congress have been supportive of limiting the tax-exempt status of municipal bonds. Removing this tax perk for bond investors would force governments to offer higher interest rates on the debt, thus increasing their cost of paying off that debt.

    It’s hard to overstate the potential impact of such a move. One estimate pegged the current tax perk savings for state and local governments at about $714 billion from 2000 to 2014. For its part, the federal government estimates it loses as much as $30 billion in potential income tax revenue each year as a result of the perk.

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    Tuesday
    Dec132016

    Budget Shortfalls Expected in the Most States Since Recession

    Almost half the states cut their budgets this year, and that trend is likely to continue into 2017.
    BY  DECEMBER 13, 2016

    Weak revenues are causing the most state budget shortfalls since the Great Recession.

    According to the National Association of State Budget Officers’ (NASBO) annual state spending survey, half of all states saw revenues come in lower than budgeted in fiscal 2016 and nearly as many (24) are seeing those weak revenue conditions carry into fiscal 2017, which ends in summer 2017 for most states. It marks the highest number of states falling short since 36 budgets missed their mark in 2010.

    As a result, 19 states made mid-year budget cuts in 2016, totaling $2.8 billion. That number of states “is historically high outside of a recessionary period,” according to the report.

    The revenue slowdown is caused mainly by slow income tax growth, even slower sales tax growth and an outright decline in corporate tax revenue

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