Find me on:
This form does not yet contain any fields.
    Powered by Squarespace
    Subscribe

    Entries in economy (17)

    Friday
    Jan132017

    The Week in Public Finance: Trump's Infrastructure Plan, Risky Pensions and NYC's Surprising Fiscal Health

    A roundup of money (and other) news governments can use.
    BY  JANUARY 13, 2017

    How Will Trump's Infrastructure Plan Affect the Economy?

    Economic impact estimates are all over the map when it comes to how much of an affect President-elect Donald Trump’s 10-year $1 trillion infrastructure proposal will have on the economy. To that end, two reports came out this week that come to completely different conclusions.

    The first, by Georgetown University, says that Trump's plan could create as many as 11 million jobs. However, it cautions, the additional spending in combination with proposed tax cuts and other economic policy shifts could “overheat the economy” by increasing inflation and setting the stage for further interest rate hikes.

    The Tax Foundation had a much more modest take. This is partly because the report assessed the varying degrees of economic impact the proposal would have depending on what other policy measures are implemented. The foundation looked at the impact of a theoretical $500 billion investment by the federal government through five funding mechanisms: borrowing, cutting government spending, raising excise taxes, raising the top tax rate on individual income and raising the corporate income tax.

    Click to read more ...

    Friday
    Jan062017

    The Week in Public Finance: Repealing Obamacare, How a California Ruling Threatens Pensions and More

    A roundup of money (and other) news governments can use.
    BY  JANUARY 6, 2017

    How Much Will Dismantling Obamacare Cost?

    As leaders in Congress kick off the 115th session by assuring the public they will repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in full by the end of this year, a newly released estimate puts the cost of a total repeal at roughly $350 billion through 2027.

    According to the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, repealing the law's Medicare-related cuts and its tax increases -- such as the "Cadillac tax" on high-cost insurance plans -- could cost the government more than if it left the ACA in place.

    But the report found that lawmakers could save money if they just repeal parts of the law. For example, if Congress only does away with the ACA's coverage provisions (mainly the Medicaid expansion), it could save $1.55 trillion through 2027.

    Click to read more ...

    Wednesday
    Jan042017

    The Income Gap Between Black and White Men Is Getting Worse

    Contrary to popular belief, a new study shows there's been almost no progress over the last 70 years.
    BY  JANUARY 4, 2017

    A new study has found that the income gap between black and white men has worsened in recent decades, a finding contrary to the popular belief that it has been steadily narrowing.

    In fact, by some measures, the research showed there has been no change in the income gap between African-American and white males over the last 70 years.

    The study is authored by University of Chicago economist Kerwin Kofi Charles and Duke University economist Patrick Bayer, and is the first to look at income inequality while incorporating data from men who aren’t working. The method, said Charles, is a more accurate picture of labor market dynamics because it addresses access -- or lack thereof -- to jobs. While some men might not be working by choice, many simply can’t find a job or are kept out of the workforce by jail or their criminal record.

    Click to read more ...

    Friday
    Dec162016

    The Week in Public Finance: What the Rate Hike Means, a Legal Win for Online Sales Taxes and More

    A roundup of money (and other) news governments can use.
    BY  DECEMBER 16, 2016

    Movin' On Up

    The Federal Reserve announced a short-term interest rate hike on Wednesday, the first one in a year and a move that was largely expected. But what wasn’t on the radar was the Fed's announcement that it plans to raise rates three more times in 2017, up from previous expectations of two rate hikes.

    Given the reticence to move rates for most of the last decade, the faster pace for next year has municipal analyst Chris Mauro calling the decision a “rather splashy hawkish surprise.”

    The rate hike will move the target interest rate on short-term debt up one-quarter of a percent -- to a range of 0.5 to 0.75 percent. The Fed's previous rate hike was a year ago, and that was the first one in nine years.

    The Takeaway: The Fed's plan to raise rates signals that economic growth is accelerating.

    Click to read more ...

    Saturday
    Oct082016

    The Week in Public Finance: Pensionomics, Hidden Bank Loans and Private Equity Fees

    BY  SEPTEMBER 16, 2016

    Do Pensions Help the Economy?

    A new study on how pensioners spend their money will likely give a boost to those who want to keep traditional, defined benefit pension plans in the public sector.

    Published this week by the nonprofit National Institute on Retirement Security (NIRS), the analysis on pension retiree spending in 2014 estimates it resulted in $1.2 trillion in total economic output. The total is based on about a half-trillion in benefits paid to public and private pensioners in 2014. State and local pension benefits account for about half ($253 billion) of those benefits.

    Click to read more ...