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    Entries in Colorado (3)

    Thursday
    Aug302018

    While Feds Loosen Payday Loan Regulations, Colorado Voters Could Clamp Down

    In a year when the federal government is dialing back financial regulations, Colorado could become the 16th state to limit the notoriously high interest rates on payday loans.
    BY  AUGUST 30, 2018
    (Shutterstock)

    For a summary of November's most important ballot measures, click here.

    As the federal government walks back historic regulations on payday lending, Colorado voters this fall will be asked to tighten them -- a sign that strong consumer protections are increasingly being left to the states.

    Short-term loans, often called payday loans because they’re due on the borrower’s next payday, have average interest rates of 129 percent in Colorado. Nationally, rates average between 150 percent and more than 600 percent a year. A ballot proposal, which was certified as Initiative 126 by the secretary of state on Tuesday, would cap those rates at 36 percent. If passed, Colorado would be the 16th state, plus the District of Columbia, to limit payday loan rates.

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    Friday
    Aug242018

    The Week in Public Finance: After Teacher Strikes, Voters Will Get a Say on Education Funding

    Support for raising teacher pay is near historic highs, but is it enough for voters -- some in red states -- to approve tax increases?
    BY  AUGUST 24, 2018

    Teachers protested outside the Colorado state Capitol in Denver this spring. (AP/David Zalubowski)

    For a summary of November's most important ballot measures, click here.

    After wide-scale teacher walkouts and strikes in six states this spring, support for teacher raises is nearing an all-time high. That could be a determining factor this fall in three states where voters will be asked to approve changes to boost school funding.

    Arizona, Colorado and Oklahoma all have ballot measures on education funding and saw teacher walkouts this year. According to a new poll by the journal Education Next, nearly two out of every three respondents in those states, and others with teacher strikes, favor raising teacher pay -- a 16-point jump since last year. Nationally, about half of respondents support increasing teacher pay, the second-highest it has been in the survey's 12-year history.

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    Friday
    Dec162016

    The Week in Public Finance: What the Rate Hike Means, a Legal Win for Online Sales Taxes and More

    A roundup of money (and other) news governments can use.
    BY  DECEMBER 16, 2016

    Movin' On Up

    The Federal Reserve announced a short-term interest rate hike on Wednesday, the first one in a year and a move that was largely expected. But what wasn’t on the radar was the Fed's announcement that it plans to raise rates three more times in 2017, up from previous expectations of two rate hikes.

    Given the reticence to move rates for most of the last decade, the faster pace for next year has municipal analyst Chris Mauro calling the decision a “rather splashy hawkish surprise.”

    The rate hike will move the target interest rate on short-term debt up one-quarter of a percent -- to a range of 0.5 to 0.75 percent. The Fed's previous rate hike was a year ago, and that was the first one in nine years.

    The Takeaway: The Fed's plan to raise rates signals that economic growth is accelerating.

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