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    Entries in Alabama (2)

    Monday
    May022016

    In Online Sales Tax Fight, States Adopt New Tactics

    States are passing laws that -- they hope -- will lead to lawsuits that land the issue before the U.S. Supreme Court.
    BY  MAY 2016

    Tired of waiting for Congress to approve a tax on Internet sales, nearly two dozen states are moving to pass bills or change regulations in ways that deliberately invite lawsuits from Internet retailers. The goal? Landing the issue before the U.S. Supreme Court.

    On May 1, South Dakota became the first state to implement new legislation allowing it to collect a sales tax from out-of-state retailers who sell products over the Internet to South Dakotans. Because the legislation calls for an expedited path for judicial challenges, experts believe the law will produce a crucial first test case that the nation’s top court could take up as soon as the end of this year.

    Putting the issue of taxing online sales before the courts is part of a new coordinated effort by state legislators across the country. All told, 34 bills in 22 states have been introduced this year that would allow states to collect sales taxes from remote retailers, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. About a half-dozen of those bills have moved forward in some fashion.

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    Friday
    Feb262016

    The Week in Public Finance: States Dare Online Retailers to Sue, a Local Government Shutdown Threat and More

    A roundup of money (and other) news governments can use.
    BY  FEBRUARY 26, 2016

    Don't Like It? Sue Me

    Tired of waiting for Congress to approve a tax on Internet sales, more than a dozen states -- including Alabama, South Dakota and Utah -- are moving to pass bills or change regulations in ways that deliberately invite lawsuits from Internet retailers. The goal? Landing the issue before the U.S. Supreme Court.

    Alabama, for its part, will start enforcing an old law it says allows it to tax out-of-state sellers. The state will audit companies that don’t file returns.

    “We’re confident that some remote sellers will not comply and therefore it will lead to litigation,” Alabama Deputy Revenue Commissioner Joe Garrett told The Wall Street Journal. “We have been very open about what we’re doing.”

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